In the Four Powers Treaty, the United States, France, the United Kingdom and Japan agreed to consult with each other in the event of a future crisis in East Asia before acting. This treaty replaced the Anglo-Japanese Treaty of 1902, which had caused some concern among the United States. In the years following World War I, U.S. policymakers saw Japan as the greatest growing military threat. Heavily militarized and seeking to expand its influence and territory, Japan had the potential to threaten AMERICAN colonial possessions in Asia and profitable trade with China. However, under the 1902 agreement between the United Kingdom and Japan, the United Kingdom may be obliged to join Japan against the United States if the United States and Japan come into conflict. By terminating this treaty and creating a four-power agreement, the countries concerned ensured that none was forced to engage in conflict, but there would be a mechanism for discussion if it emerged from it. . . .